Isannah Greeley Lee1

b. perhaps about 1800
  • Last Edited: 27 May 2017

Citations

  1. Thomas Amory Lee, "The Lee Family of Marblehead", Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol.53, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=K1kMAAAAYAAJ . Salem, Mass.: (1917) , pp. 269-70.
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Col. Jeremiah Lee1

b. April 16, 1721, d. May 10, 1775
  • Col. Jeremiah Lee was born on April 16, 1721 in Manchester, Massachusetts, son of Justice Samuel and Mary (Tarring) Lee.1
  • Before 1745, Col. Jeremiah Lee moved to Marblehead, Massachusetts with his father. When he became of age he went into partnership with his father, in whose counting-room he acquired the commercial knowledge which made him in later years one of the great merchants of his time. His business with his father proved very profitable, and upon the latter's death, in 1753, he continued in business as a great importing and exporting merchant, whose name was known in all the commercial ports of Europe, and whose business at the period of the Revolution probably was more extensive than that of any other merchant in the then British colonies. He early became one of the most influential men of Marblehead, and it must be remembered that Marblehead at that time was not a mere fishing village, but the great shipping centre of New England, second to Boston in population and first in point of shipping. There were then sixty merchants engaged in the foreign trade.2
  • Jeremiah married Martha Swett, daughter of Joseph Swett Jr. and Martha Stacey, on June 25, 1745.1
  • Jeremiah Lee apparently took part in town affairs from an early time. About 1751 he was commissioned colonel of the Marblehead regiment, and in 1755 he was appointed a member of a committee to petition His Majesty to disallow the act of the General Court in 1754 imposing an excise duty on spirituous liquors, wines, lemons, oranges, etc. The same year Col. Jacob Fowle, Col. Jeremiah Lee and Major Richard Reed were appointed a committee to build the powder house, a circular brick magazine on the old ferry road. He was Justice of the Peace, as were his two brothers, father and grandfather, being appointed Jan. 11, 1758, and Nov. 19, 1761.2
  • The heirs of Joseph Swett, Jr., gave a silver flagon to the Marblehead Church:

    qwblockquotewqJan: 3: 1759. Joseph Sweet, Esq., having left Pound 12:10 L.M. a legacy to the Church, and, his heirs desiring that it should be made into a flagon for the communion table, the Church having voted the appropriating of it to that use, it was accordingly made into a Flagon, with additional sums sufficient therefore from the Heirs -- Mr. Samuel Sweet, Mrs. Ruth Hooper, Mrs. Martha Lee, and Mrs. Joseph Lemmon -- and this day brought down & presented to the church for which the Pastor of the Chh returned thanks to the several heirs. (total 25:13:4 value)qw/blockquotewq

    The inscription on the bottom of the flagon is in Latin:

    qwblockquotewqHoc Legatum Josephi Sweett Ar.t una cum Additamento ejus Haeredum, Di S. Sweett, Dae R. Hooper, Dae M. Lee, et Di J. Lemmon, ad Usum sacrosanctae Caenae, in prima Christi Ecclesia apud Marblehead, consecratum: Mau 7, 1759. oz 55:12:0qw/blockquotewq.3
    Silver flagon given to the Church of Marblehead, Massachusetts, by the heirs of Joseph Swett, Jr. (1689-1745). His name, their names, and the date 7 May 1759 are engraved on the bottom of the flagon. The engraving on the right is his Coat of Arms.

    Photographed by Rick Ashley, 22 September 1998
    Coat of Arms of Joseph Swett, Jr. (1689-1745) Marblehead, Massachusetts great-grandson of John Swett of Newbury

    Photographed by Rick Ashley, 22 September 1998

    Because it does not have the crest (a pierced star between two gillyflowers), this Coat of Arms does not descend from the grant of Arms and Crest to Adrian Swete of Traine Manor, Modbury, Devon, England, in 1712. For the same reason, it does not descend from the award of Arms and Crest to Guy Swete of Traine by King Edward the Fourth in 1473. Because the shield is the family identifier, and a crest is an extra honor, this shield represents a family tradition that predates 1473. [Fox-Davies, A Complete Guide to Heraldry, 1978 ed.]
    Inscription on the bottom of the silver flagon presented to the Church of Marblehead, Massachusetts, by the heirs of Joseph Swett, Jr. (1689-1745).

    Photographed by Rick Ashley, 22 September 1998
  • Col. Jeremiah Lee was moderator of the town meeting held on Sept. 18, 1765, to give instructions to their representatives concerning the Stamp Act. He belonged to the well known "Tuesday Evening Club" of Marblehead, of which Gen. Glover, Elbridge Gerry, Dr. Story (father of Justice Joseph Story), Col. Lee, and other well known citizens were members. The meetings were held in the Prentiss house on Mugford street, where the Committee of Safety later held its meetings. An interesting letter from Col. Lee of about this period (4 Dec 1767) to Capt. John Allen of Manchester, on placing him in command of the schooner "Derby," is worthy of note on account of the last few words : "Break no Acts of Trade, suffer no man to bring above six pounds of Tobacco." Shortly after, Colonel Lee built his beautiful mansion on the north side of Washington street. At the time of its erection it was one of the finest and most expensively furnished homes in the colonies. It was designed by English architects, and cost more than £10,000. It was stated in the Boston papers of that time that this was "the most elegant and costly furnished home in the Bay State Colony." The finish used in its construction was brought from England as ballast on the colonel's own ship," as was the furniture. Rev. Manasseh Cutler at an early date described it as the most magnificent house in these colonies, though he found nothing else to admire in Marblehead. By 1916, it was owned by the Marblehead Historical Society, which issued a little book extolling its beauties, the closing sentence of which is as follows :

    "Jeremiah Lee builded better than he knew when he placed his home in the heart of the little town, and the reclaimed mansion stands to-day a monument not only of the early prosperity of the town, but a reminder to young and old of Lee and others of his day, who gave of their best to their town and their country. As it was the pride and wonder of their day, it is still the joy and admiration of our own."

    As of 1916, Four Presidents of the United States, including Washington, and also the Marquis de Lafayette, had been among its many guests.4
  • He became one of the wealthiest men in America. The Jeremiah Lee mansion at 161 Washington Street, Marblehead, which he built in 1768, now (2002) includes the offices of the Marblehead Historical Society.3
  • At a town meeting held May 10, 1770, Jeremiah Lee and six other citizens were appointed a "Committee of Inspection," and a few days later the following notice appeared: "The Committee of the Trade, in this Town, have minutely examined all the Parcels of unexcepted goods that were stored in the Town, and have the Pleasure to inform the Publick that they do not find one single Breach made on them for Sale. Jeremiah Lee, Chairman of the Committee."

    The various measures of this committee evidently made enemies, as the entire first page of the next issue of the Essex Gazette for May 15-22, is occupied by a letter beginning "To the Publick. The committee of merchants and traders in Marblehead were called upon by sundry persons, in the last week's Gazette, who seem to be very angry that the said committee made known to the public that they refused to come into the agreement of merchants and traders in this town."

    So many persons were drowned at sea in the year 1770 that a committee, of which Colonel Lee was chairman, was appointed to receive and distribute charitable donations collected in the Province for the relief of the widows and orphans of those persons, belonging to Marblehead, who perished at sea since January, 1768.5
  • In 1774 Colonel Lee was elected to represent the town at the Continental Congress, but declined the honor, as the condition of his private affairs was such as to prevent acceptance. In September, 1774, Marblehead sent to the County Convention held at Ipswich the following delegates: Jeremiah Lee, Azor Orne, Elbridge Gerry, Joshua Orne, William Dolliber. Colonel Lee found there his brother, Col. John Lee, as chairman of the delegates from Manchester. The convention elected Col. Jeremiah Lee its chairman.

    Meantime the town had required all the officers of the Marblehead regiment to resign and had appointed new offcers. A letter of John Andrews, dated Oct. 1, 1774, gives a graphic picture of the times. "The County towns in general, have chose their own officers, and muster . for exercise once a week at least --- when the parson as well as the Squire stands in the Ranks with a firelock.--- In particular at Marblehead, they turn out three or four times a week, when Col. Lee as well as the Clergymen there are not ashamed to appear in the Ranks, to be taught the manual exercise in particular." It is evident from a letter of Colonel Lee directed to the famous Captain Tucker, ordering him to take the brig "Young Phoenix" to South Carolina and the Isle of Wight, that he intended to go into active service. He directs Captain Tucker to return and seek some safe port at home if there is war with England, for, wrote the patriotic merchant, "then I shall be in the Provincial army, as I am determined not to survive my country's liberty and privileges."6
  • Jeremiah died on May 10, 1775 in Newbury, Massachusetts, at age 54.1
  • Last Edited: 16 Jan 2017

Family: Martha Swett b. June 12, 1726, d. November 14, 1791

Citations

  1. Thomas Amory Lee, "The Lee Family of Marblehead," The Essex Institute Historical Colklections, Vol. LII (1916): p. 329.
  2. "The Lee Family of Marblehead", p. 330.
  3. Ben H. Swett, THE SWETT FAMILY OF MARBLEHEAD, MASSACHUSETTS, , at http://swett-genealogy.com/08Marblehead.html . (31 July 2002).
  4. "The Lee Family of Marblehead", p. 330-1, citing Lamson's History of Manchester, p. 120; Comer's Landmarks in the Old Bay State, p. 205; The Lee Mansion, by Miss Hannah Tutt, p. 16.
  5. "The Lee Family of Marblehead", p. 332, citing Essex Gazette, May 8-15, 1770.
  6. "The Lee Family of Marblehead", p. 332-3, citing Mass. Hist. Society Proceedings, 1st series, v. 8, p. 872; Sheppard's Life of Samuel Tucker, p. 27.
  7. Thomas Amory Lee, Colonel Jeremiah Lee, patriot, , at https://archive.org/details/coloneljeremiahl00leet . Salem, Mass.: The Essex Institute, (1916) , p. 17.
  8. Thomas Amory Lee, Colonel Jeremiah Lee, patriot, , at https://archive.org/details/coloneljeremiahl00leet . Salem, Mass.: The Essex Institute, (1916) , p. 19.
  9. Thomas Amory Lee, Colonel Jeremiah Lee, patriot, , at https://archive.org/details/coloneljeremiahl00leet . Salem, Mass.: The Essex Institute, (1916) , p. 20.
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Jeremiah Lee1

b. November 20, 1763, d. between 1775 and 1792
  • Last Edited: 16 Jan 2017

Citations

  1. Thomas Amory Lee, Colonel Jeremiah Lee, patriot, , at https://archive.org/details/coloneljeremiahl00leet . Salem, Mass.: The Essex Institute, (1916) , p. 20.
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John Lee1

b. July 6, 1778, d. December, 1799
  • John Lee was born on July 6, 1778 in Marblehead, Massachusetts.1
  • He was the son of Col. William Raymond Lee and Mary Lemmon.1
  • He was lost at sea in December, 1799 at age 21, unmarried; lost at sea, unmarried.2
  • He was a handsome man, and a fine miniature of him, apparently by Hiss Goodrich, was owned by Miss Sarah Dearborn of Boston, granddaughter of Gen. E. A. S. Dearborn.1
  • Last Edited: 3 May 2014

Citations

  1. Thomas Amory Lee, Colonel William Raymond Lee of the Revolution, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=31wSAAAAYAAJ . Salem, Mass.: The Essex Institute, (1917) , p. 25. Refer to this source for additional biography.
  2. Thomas Amory Lee, "The Lee Family of Marblehead," The Essex Institute Historical Colklections, Vol. LII (1916): p. 258-259.
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John Lee1

b. June 26, 1806, d. August 16, 1808
  • Last Edited: 26 Sep 2016

Citations

  1. Vital Records of Marblehead, Massachusetts to the end of the year 1849, Salem, Mass.: The Essex Institute, (1903) , Vol. 1, p. 314.
  2. Vital Records of Marblehead, Massachusetts to the end of the year 1849, Salem, Mass.: The Essex Institute, (1903) , Vol. 2, p. 602.
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John Lee1

b. August 18, 1808
  • Last Edited: 26 Sep 2016

Citations

  1. Vital Records of Marblehead, Massachusetts to the end of the year 1849, Salem, Mass.: The Essex Institute, (1903) , Vol. 1, p. 314.
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Joseph Lee1

b. November 23, 1748
  • Last Edited: 16 Jan 2017

Citations

  1. Thomas Amory Lee, Colonel Jeremiah Lee, patriot, , at https://archive.org/details/coloneljeremiahl00leet . Salem, Mass.: The Essex Institute, (1916) , p. 17.
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Joseph Lee1

b. September 25, 1780, d. October 8, 1780
  • Last Edited: 3 May 2014

Citations

  1. Thomas Amory Lee, Colonel William Raymond Lee of the Revolution, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=31wSAAAAYAAJ . Salem, Mass.: The Essex Institute, (1917) , p. 25. Refer to this source for additional biography.
  2. Thomas Amory Lee, "The Lee Family of Marblehead," The Essex Institute Historical Colklections, Vol. LII (1916): p. 258-259.
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Joseph Lemmon Lee1

b. 1819/20
  • Last Edited: 26 Sep 2016

Citations

  1. Vital Records of Salem, Massachusetts to the end of the year 1849, Salem, Mass.: The Essex Institute, (1916) , Vol. 1, p. 518.
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Joseph Lemon Lee1

b. May 10, 1785, d. December 21, 1819
  • Reference: 0502bi
  • Last Edited: 17 Apr 2016

Citations

  1. Thomas Amory Lee, Colonel William Raymond Lee of the Revolution, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=31wSAAAAYAAJ . Salem, Mass.: The Essex Institute, (1917) , p. 26. Refer to this source for additional biography.
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Josiah Lee1

b. August 13, 1711
  • Last Edited: 4 Nov 2009

Citations

  1. James Savage, A Genealogical Dictionary or The first Settlers of New England showing Three Generations or Those who came Before May, 1692 on the Basis of Farmer's Register, (1862) , vol. 3, p. 73.
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Lucy Lee

b. July 8, 1770, d. March 24, 1854
  • Last Edited: 28 Sep 2009

Family: Joel Griswold b. December 6, 1764, d. July 19, 1835

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Lucy Lee1

b. perhaps about 1743
  • Last Edited: 21 Jan 2015

Family: Thomas Fessenden b. July 10, 1741, d. February 25, 1804

Citations

  1. Find a Grave, at http://www.findagrave.com/, Created by: Bill Boyington
    Record added: Nov 13, 2006
    Find A Grave Memorial# 16639475.
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Mabel Lee1

b. February 17, 1730, d. October 10, 1822
  • Mabel Lee was born on February 17, 1730, daughter of Stephen and Mary (Hubbard) Lee.1
  • Mabel married Daniel Ludington, son of Daniel Ludington and Susannah Clark, on April 26, 1733. They had no children.1
  • Mabel died on October 10, 1822 at age 92.1
  • Last Edited: 18 Nov 2015

Citations

  1. Tenney Smith, Charles Smith and Rachel Amy Bryant, their ancestors and descendants, , at https://archive.org/details/charlessmithrach00smit . Brattleboro, Vermont: The Vermont Printing Co., (1938) , pp. 198-9.
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Martha Lee1

b. January 16, 1760, d. January 16, 1833
  • Last Edited: 16 Jan 2017

Citations

  1. Thomas Amory Lee, Colonel Jeremiah Lee, patriot, , at https://archive.org/details/coloneljeremiahl00leet . Salem, Mass.: The Essex Institute, (1916) , p. 19.
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Martha Lee1

b. February 17, 1702
  • Last Edited: 4 Nov 2009

Citations

  1. James Savage, A Genealogical Dictionary or The first Settlers of New England showing Three Generations or Those who came Before May, 1692 on the Basis of Farmer's Register, (1862) , vol. 3, p. 73.
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Mary Lee1

b. August 31, 1747, d. September 14, 1747
  • Last Edited: 16 Jan 2017

Citations

  1. Thomas Amory Lee, Colonel Jeremiah Lee, patriot, , at https://archive.org/details/coloneljeremiahl00leet . Salem, Mass.: The Essex Institute, (1916) , p. 17.
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Mary Lee1

b. September 16, 1753, d. October 31, 1819
  • Reference: 1006fe
  • Last Edited: 16 Jan 2017

Family: Hon. Nathaniel Tracy b. August 11, 1751

Citations

  1. Thomas Amory Lee, Colonel Jeremiah Lee, patriot, , at https://archive.org/details/coloneljeremiahl00leet . Salem, Mass.: The Essex Institute, (1916) , p. 17.
  2. Thomas Amory Lee, "The Lee Family of Marblehead", Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol.53, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=K1kMAAAAYAAJ . Salem, Mass.: (1917) , pp. 269-70.
  3. Thomas Amory Lee, Colonel Jeremiah Lee, patriot, , at https://archive.org/details/coloneljeremiahl00leet . Salem, Mass.: The Essex Institute, (1916) , p. 19.
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Mary Lee1

b. July 25, 1772, d. about 1850
  • Reference: 0502bb
  • Last Edited: 3 May 2014

Family: Capt. Thomas Cary Willard b. perhaps about 1770, d. 1801

Citations

  1. Thomas Amory Lee, Colonel William Raymond Lee of the Revolution, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=31wSAAAAYAAJ . Salem, Mass.: The Essex Institute, (1917) , p. 25. Refer to this source for additional biography.
  2. Thomas Amory Lee, "The Lee Family of Marblehead," The Essex Institute Historical Colklections, Vol. LII (1916): p. 258-259.
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