Anna Swett1

b. October 17, 1756
  • Last Edited: 10 Oct 2009

Citations

  1. RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project: JOHN SWETT OF NEWBURY, at http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bswett&id=I00695
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Anna Woodbury Swett1

b. September 30, 1826, d. June 14, 1904
  • Last Edited: 10 Oct 2009

Family: Benjamin Knight Prentiss b. December 8, 1828

Citations

  1. RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project: JOHN SWETT OF NEWBURY, at http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bswett&id=I00695
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Anna Woodbury Swett1

b. June 9, 1793, d. after 1851
  • THIS LISTING HAS NOT YET BEEN AUDITED, AND MAY NOT BE ACCURATE; A.
  • Anna Woodbury Swett was born on June 9, 1793.1
  • She was the daughter of Stephen Swett and Anna Nancy Prince.1
  • Anna died after 1851.1
  • Last Edited: 13 Aug 2009

Citations

  1. RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project: JOHN SWETT OF NEWBURY, at http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bswett&id=I00695
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Annie G. Swett1

b. 1854
  • Last Edited: 13 Aug 2009

Citations

  1. RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project: JOHN SWETT OF NEWBURY, at http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bswett&id=I00695
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Benjamin Swett1

b. June 14, 1829, d. December 31, 1891
  • THIS LISTING HAS NOT YET BEEN AUDITED, AND MAY NOT BE ACCURATE; A.
  • Benjamin Swett was born on June 14, 1829.1
  • He was the son of Francis Swett and Mary Wadden.1
  • Benjamin married Lucy LeFavour.1
  • Benjamin died on December 31, 1891 at age 62.1
  • Last Edited: 10 Oct 2009

Family: Lucy LeFavour b. September 6, 1828, d. August 28, 1914

Citations

  1. RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project: JOHN SWETT OF NEWBURY, at http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bswett&id=I00695
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Benjamin Swett1

b. October 31, 1801, d. September 21, 1815
  • Last Edited: 27 Jul 2015

Citations

  1. Vital Records of Marblehead, Massachusetts to the end of the year 1849, Salem, Mass.: The Essex Institute, (1903) , Vol. 1, p. 500, "Bible record now in possession of Miss Sarah S. Swett."
  2. Vital Records of Marblehead, Massachusetts to the end of the year 1849, Salem, Mass.: The Essex Institute, (1903) , Vol. 2, p. 681.
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Benjamin Swett1

b. February 18, 1776, d. March 26, 1820
  • THIS LISTING HAS NOT YET BEEN AUDITED, AND MAY NOT BE ACCURATE; A.
  • Benjamin Swett was born on February 18, 1776.1
  • He was the son of Samuel Swett and Anna Woodbury.1
  • Benjamin married Sarah Webb of Salem.1
  • Benjamin died on March 26, 1820 at age 44.1
  • Last Edited: 25 Apr 2010

Family: Sarah Webb of Salem b. about 1782

Citations

  1. RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project: JOHN SWETT OF NEWBURY, at http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bswett&id=I00695
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Benjamin Swett1

b. August 19, 1804, d. December 21, 1823
  • THIS LISTING HAS NOT YET BEEN AUDITED, AND MAY NOT BE ACCURATE; A.
  • Benjamin Swett was born on August 19, 1804.1
  • He was the son of Benjamin Swett and Sarah Webb of Salem.1
  • Benjamin died on December 21, 1823 at age 19.1
  • Last Edited: 13 Aug 2009

Citations

  1. RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project: JOHN SWETT OF NEWBURY, at http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bswett&id=I00695
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Capt. Benjamin Swett1

b. 1626, d. June 29, 1677
  • Father: John Swett1 b. perhaps 1585, d. January 13, 1651/52
  • Mother: Sarah (?)2 b. perhaps 1584, d. December 11, 1650
  • Reference: 8048d
  • THIS LISTING HAS NOT YET BEEN AUDITED, AND MAY NOT BE ACCURATE; A.
  • Capt. Benjamin Swett was born in 1626 in England. He lived for seven years on the Woodbridge farm in Newbury, Massachusetts, where the Woodbridge school later stood.2
  • He was the son of John Swett and Sarah (?)1,2
  • Benjamin married Hester Weare on November 1, 1647 in Newbury, Massachusetts, as her first husband.2
  • That Mr. Swett and his brother Weare had not fully adopted Newbury as a permanent residence, appears by a petition from some of the active men of Dover and Newbury in 1649 "to the Honred Generale Courte now assembled at Boston," signed by Richard Walderne, Benia : Swett, Nathaniel Weare, and others, praying for "the grant of a trackte of land at Pennecooke of twelve miles square, which being granted," the petitioners will "be at the cost and charge of viewinge of it, and consider fully about it wheather to proceed on for the settlinge of a towne or noe, and for that end shall crave the liberty of three yeares to give in " their decision. This scheme they abandoned and their lease of the Woodbridge farm having expired, about 1662 or 1663 they removed with their families, to Hampton in New Hampshire.3
  • Mr. Swett and his brother Weare, lived on the most intimate terms of friendship, the more delightful, that each was a man of marked independence of character, calculated to lead others than to follow, and their life-long brotherly intercourse begun in this matrimonial alliance, had no bond in any relation of dependance, but in the union of brave hearts and the congeniality of noble minds.1
  • Mr. Swett was chosen a Commissioner for the county rates in 1665 and 1668, and a "selectman" in 1665, 1669 and 1675, and in 16702 received a grant of one hundred acres of land in "No. 56," but his chief service was in improving their military discipline. His fondness for martial life, was early developed and appreciated by his townsmen who elected him to offices of great consequence in the public estimation ; witness the following :

    "Whereas it was ordered the last session of this court that the towne of Newbury should goe to a new election for there Ensigne in respect the last choyce was not cleare which accordingly they have done and have legally made choyce of Benjamin Swet to be their ensigne and they desire the approbation of this honord Court of what is done and that he may be confirmed in that place, the Deputs have granted their request and desire the consent of or Gouvner and magist thereunto.

    William Torrey Cleric.

    14, (8) 51. Consented to by the magist

    Edw Rawson, Secret
  • The following document, copied from the original, preserved in the archives of Massachusetts, is apparently in Captain Swett's elegant hand writing and was doubtless his production.

    "To the much Honoured Generall Court Assembled in Boston May 31st 1671: The petition of the Commissioned and other officers of the Militia in the County of Norfolk.

    Humbly Sheweth.

    That the action which (as we are informed) passed in the honoured generall Court at ye sessions in May, 1670 in choseing & appointeing Capt. Robbt Pike to be the Sergeant Major over the militia of Norfolk, & his exerciseing his authority over us as Major, hath put us & many others upon consideration of or condition in respect of or military affaires; whereupon viewing & examining the first section of the Law entitled military, wee finde momentous clauses which we humbly present to yor grave consideration, viz., That in ye sayd law by the Authority of this Court, there was priviledg granted to the freemen of the severall counties therein named, to chuse out of them selves one to be their Serjeant major, who so chosen, is to be sworn as the sd law directs, and that A Serjant major beeing once stated, the sd freemen by law have not power of new choice, so long as hee lives, and holds ye place; Nor yet the Majr genrl or genrl court (as We with Submission humbly propose) to send forth their warrants for such a choice to be made, ffarther in the sd section we find that by order and authority of this court, the Militia of Norfolk (we suppose by reason of ye paucity of ye number, & of men of ability among them which we readily grant) was stated at ye same time under the care and conduct of the Sergt Majr of Essex, with a proviso, as it is there incerted, wch hath given & still would give good satisfaction to your petitioners, & the County in generall, both soldiers, & others of wt degree soever, assuredly beleeving yt we could not so well have provided for orselves, had it then or should it now be left to the freemens choyce, as it was in other counties not more faithful to Authority than orselves. We can not conceive any advantage by a change, & here of none ye ever spake of the necessity of having a Majr among orselves, except some one or two whose reasons we could never fathom or see ground for, in respect of the service itselfe. We readily grant this court hath authority over us, and their judicious pleasure we shall submitt to, & as we have been, so we are & shall be free at all times to submitt or persons & estates to the orders comeing from the higher powers: but heareing some have procured this court to put a Majr upon us when we had no thoughts, nor saw any need of it, we are bold (with the favour of the court) to appear in this manner to make or motion & leave it with yor honoured selves, and humbly to declare how wee have through or weakness (if we were mistaken in ye law) been misslead in or apprehensions, we had allmost sayd, by the contriveance of one or, (friends to themselves) beguiled. We shall not urge wt Samuell sayd to Israeli when they desired to be like other people, and how afterwards they cried out of that as great sinn. Though we are not as other counteys in that or majr lived not in this county, yet we esteemed orselves in as good condition as others, and were not ambitious of alteration, wch we conceived could not be made but from better to worse: we have justly conceived orselves in or former condition not to be without a liveing head, wch this court in yr wisdom did set over us, & we upon good ground have gloried in; and now being unexpectedly stripped of that or martiall glory, we cannot but speak, move & request this honored court that our selves, & the militia of Norfolk may be stated as formerly, under the command and conduct of the Majr of Essex, of whom we desire leave of this court to say he is or major; But if it be the absolute determination of the court, that we must have a major liveing amonst us, we crave humbly the like privilidges wch other countyes have had, that there may issue out warrants according to direction in the law fore-cited for a free choice. If it be replyed that a law of a later date hath otherwise ordered the choice, & put it into the hands of this court, we desire leave humbly to urge or motion thus far that the law made in May 1669, regulating the choyce of officers hath respect to the choyce of such officers as were formerly chosen by a mixt multitude in private companies, & not of such as are chosen according to or patterns (if we mistake not) wholly by the vote & voice of freemen whos libertyes & prividges this court hath been, and is, sedulously carefull to prserve & mayntayn : we beg this court seariously to weigh the first clause of the law made May 69. wch sayth all commission officers yt at present are in being, are confirmed according to their respective commissions, wch clause we conceive did confirm the majr of Essex, as Majr still to the county of Norfolk, he being A chief commission officer to us & confirmed by the law mentioned, the law not putting fformer officers out, but taking order for future choyce where need should bee, by death, removeall, or discharge of any from their trust, none of wch (we prsume) are applicable pr or former Majr, Whose care over us and apprhension of being confirmed to the law cited is evident in that in the year 69 he had concluded to exercise the regiment of Norfolk, had not the councell of ye country determined there should be noe genrll trayneing that sommer: at other times he hath taken care of us wch we now forbeare to particularize. It was upon the prmises mentioned that we have not before moved to put in or votes for another Major, wch otherwise we might and should have done before that law was made, wch seems to debar us of that priviledg, wch did Equally belong to us with the County of Essex in chuseing of a distinct Majr after the death of their & or Majr. We would not in the least be understood to oppose the Authority of this court or the laws established, but shall allwaies endeavor to uphold the authority of the same : but or aime is that the life of or Majr may not prove the death & buriall of those rights & priviledges which were established on us, as on other freemen, wch we should have improved, had we been destitute of a Majr two years since. We crave leave to summ up all in a few words, wch is humbly to request of this court, that they would be pleased to allow us the conduct of or former Majr under whom we have enjoyed, as government, so quietnes, wch hath not been altogether so, since the rumor of a change ; this is or first and grand request, desire and aime of or hearts, & prsent addresse or ells that you would vouchsafe us the like liberty in choice wch other counties have had, considering now, & in wt manner we have been deprived without any forfite of or owne we know of, neither yet doe we understand how the motion for a new majr came to this court. If this honored Court of their wonted clemency shall as an act of favor at least grant vs or request especially or chiefe request, to settle vs under the commands of our former [and withdraw the commission of the later] Major. It will & shall strongly oblige yor Petitioners if not the whole County (as in duety they are bound) ever to pray for yor prosperity & continewance to maintayn the rights, libertyes & priviledges of the people & freemen of this Jurisdiction.

    Benjamin Swett: 1671
    John Seuerans
    John Gillman James Parker
    William More John Hoyt senr
    Joseph Dow Jonathan Thinge
    John Steuens Peter Johnson
    William Osgood
    Thomas Philbrick
    William Maston

    The deputyes Judge not meete to graunt this petition With refference to the Consent of or Honord magistrt hereto.

    7: 4: 1671. William Torrey Cleric.5
  • Mr. Swett acquired great celebrity for his skill and daring in hunting and fighting the Indians, by whom he eventually lost his life, while in command of the Massachusetts forces at the East. In 1675 and '76, in the Provincial Account Book, as preserved in the archives of the New England Historic-Genealogical Society, Benjamin Swett is the chief name in the accounts with "Hampton-Town."

    In 1675, during Philip's war, there was a fear of "a design of a general rising of the Indians against the English all over the country," and their frequent and bloody incursions filled the whole country with terror. It was at this time that Capt. Thomas Lake, the eminent merchant of Boston, was killed at his fort at Arowsick. Men of true courage and discretion were now proved and known, and Swett won for himself a high rank among the heroes of our Colonial wars. Hubbard, after relating many tragedies of the dreadful year 1675, says, "Much about this time [September] one Goodman Robinson of Exeter, with his son, were travelling toward Hampton, when, as they were going along, they were way-laid by three Indians, viz. John Sampson, Cromwel, and John Linde who shot down the old man, whom they left dead upon the place ; his son, hearing the guns, escaped their hands by running into a swamp whither the Indians pursued him, but could not overtake him, so as he got safe into Hampton about midnight, where he declared what befell him by the way, and how narrowly he avoided the danger; intimating likewise that he feared that his Father was killed, which was proved too true, by Lieut. Swet, who the next day with a dozen Soldiers of the Town went to search those Woods, where they found the poor old man, shot through at his back, the Bullet having pierced through at his Body and was stopped by the skin on the other side."6
  • The remainder of Mr. Swett's life was passed in active military service. He was always in that post which most required sagacity and courage. In 1677, "the savages seemed to have marked out the town of Wells, in Maine, for early and utter destruction. From their first entering it, April 6th, when they killed three, to the end of the month, they made attacks upon the people and their garrison several times. On the 13th, [or 29th,] John Weld and Benjamin Storer were killed by them. Two or three, approaching a man and boy who were fowling in the marshes, were first espied by the boy, when the man was half sitting and fixing his flint. Springing up as the boy spoke, he aimed his gun directly at them, crying out, "Ah, you rogues, I've been looking for you;" when they, being startled by his bold rebuff, turned and fled. The fort was commanded by Lieut. Swett, a brave and vigilant officer — always alert and active for the safety of the inhabitants. Seeing a strolling Indian, who was in fact a decoy, Swett despatched eleven of his men towards the place, to make discoveries. By venturing too far, they fell into an ambush, when two were shot dead and one mortally wounded. Hearing the report of the guns, Swett sent out auxiliaries, who killed five or six, and would have done thorough execution, had not an Irishman sung out, "here they be! here they be!" which so alarmed them, that they withdrew and sheltered themselves among the thick trees and bushes.7
  • From this time the Indians continuing their sanguinary attacks, excited the alarm of the government for the safety of the distant and exposed settlements. The government having had good experience of the faithfulness and valor of the Christian Indians about Natick, (some of whom had been on the eastern service in February, and had given counsel, which if followed, would doubtless have worsted the enemy at that time) armed two hundred of them and ordered a recruit of forty English soldiers, and all such able bodied men to be enlisted or impressed, as could be found, who had come from the Province of Maine, to be under the command of Capt. Benjamin Swett of Hampton, and Lieut. Richardson, to march to the falls of Taconick on Kennebeck river, where, it was said, the Indians had six forts, well furnished with amunition. Hubbard says that the governnment "not judging aright of the number of the enemy, much underdid their business, for besides that the number they sent of English was a great deal too small, those that were chosen this bout, to take their turns in the service abroad, were, many of them, young, raw, and unexperienced soldiers, who were not able to look danger, much less death, in the face, in cool blood, by which means it came to pass that the enterprise succeeded so ill." The forces were embarked in vessels which came to an anchor off Black Point, in Scarboro, on the 28th of June, where Captain Swett, being informed that some Indians had been seen, went on shore with a party, confident in his strength, and began to try the valor and courage of his company before he had disciplined them, or had any experience of their ability to fight. They were joined by some of the inhabitants, so as to make ninety in all. The next morning, June 29th, the enemy shewed themselves on a plain in three parties. A large decoy, supposed to be the main body of the Indians, feigned a retreat, and were pursued a distance of two miles from the fort, when the English found themselves in a most exposed situation, between a thicket and a swamp, upon the declivity of a hill, and instantly from an ambush on each side great numbers of Indians, rising with a war whoop, fired at once upon the two divisions, and turning so violently and suddenly upon them, threw the young and undisciplined soldiers into confusion. Swett with a few of the more resolute, fought bravely on the retreat, till he came near the fort, when he was killed ; sixty more were left dead or wounded, and the rest got into the fort. Hubbard's account is that, "while some were ready to run and shift for themselves, the Captain strived so long to keep them together, to bring off the dead and wounded men, that he brought himself and company into danger of an utter overthrow, which soon after took place; for the poor unskilful soldiers, being scattered, were shifting for themselves, while a few resolute men of courage bore the brunt of the service till they were in a manner all knocked down. Lieutenant Richardson was killed soon after the first onset; the Captain, having received near twenty wounds, yet still held out, defending and encouraging his men, till he was surrounded with more of his enemies than he was able to grapple with, and so was at the last barbarously murdered by them within a little of the garrison house. There were slain at this time somewhat above forty of the English, and twelve of the friendly Indians that assisted, very few escaping, but were either killed right out or dangerously wounded."8,9
  • Williamson's description of the fight is that "though the ranks were broken, the engagement was sharp and protracted, Richardson was presently slain and many on both sides soon shared the same fate. Swett fought the enemy hand to hand; displaying upon the spot and in a retreat of two miles, great presence of mind as well as personal courage, in repeated rallies of his men, in his exertions to bring off the dead and wounded, and in defence of his rear, upon which the savages hung with destructive fury. At last, wounded in twenty places, and exhausted by loss of blood and by fatigue, he was grappled, thrown to the ground, and barbarously cut in pieces at the gates of the garrison. With this intrepid officer, fell sixty of his men, forty English and twenty Indians, being two thirds of the whole number in the engagement. Seldom is the merit of a military officer more genuine, seldom is the death of one more deeply lamented." At Kirkwood's neck, Black Point, on the plains where he fell with his sixty men, the remains of the extensive fortifications, erected in 1682 by Capt. Joshua Scottow and the town of Scarborough, are still distinctly visible; and on the neck is the cellar of the old garrison from which Swett rallied out for the fatal engagement.10
  • It is evident from these contemporary accounts that the fatal result of this expedition is to be attributed chiefly to the error of the Government in supplying raw, undisciplined soldiers for a service, peculiarly hazardous, and often attended with imminent peril. The heroic commander and his 'forlorn hope,' became a sacrifice to the weakness, negligence, or still more blameable conduct of the authorities.

    The probate records at Ipswich show that his widow Hester administered on his estate in the fall of the same year, which was valued by Rev. Seaborn Cotton, Samuel Dalton, Antony Stanyan and Steven Greenleaf at £558 19 shillings and his debts £2 and six shillings.11
  • Last Edited: 6 Apr 2010

Family: Hester Weare b. 1628 or 1629, d. January 16, 1718

Citations

  1. John Wingate Thornton, Mementos of the Swett Family, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=mv4UAAAAYAAJ . Roxbury, Mass.: Privately Printed, (December 1851) , p. 6 Portions of this volume are confusing and misleading. Additional biographical material may be found in this book.
  2. William Richard Cutter, Genealogical and family history of western New York: a record of the achievements of her people in the making of a commonwealth and the building of a nation, Lewis Historical Publishing Co., (1912) , p. 344.
  3. John Wingate Thornton, Mementos of the Swett Family, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=mv4UAAAAYAAJ . Roxbury, Mass.: Privately Printed, (December 1851) , p. 8, citing letters of the Rev. Jonathan French, D. D , for fifty years pastor of the ancient church of North Hampton, N. H., who was thoroughly versed in New Hampshire history and in the antiquities of his own town. Great use was made of his manuscripts in the preparation of the account of the Dearborn family in volume 2d of the "Register." Similar acknowledgements are due to Dr. French's son-in-law, Joseph Dow, A. M. State Mss. vol. 67. Military Papers, i. p. 54.
  4. John Wingate Thornton, Mementos of the Swett Family, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=mv4UAAAAYAAJ . Roxbury, Mass.: Privately Printed, (December 1851) , p. 8-9, citing Col. Samuel Swett mss., and Military, vol. 67, p. 67.
  5. John Wingate Thornton, Mementos of the Swett Family, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=mv4UAAAAYAAJ . Roxbury, Mass.: Privately Printed, (December 1851) , p.9-12.
  6. John Wingate Thornton, Mementos of the Swett Family, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=mv4UAAAAYAAJ . Roxbury, Mass.: Privately Printed, (December 1851) , p. 12-13, citing Hubbard's "Narrative of the Troubles with the Indians," &c. London, 1677, 4to, p. 12-19.
  7. John Wingate Thornton, Mementos of the Swett Family, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=mv4UAAAAYAAJ . Roxbury, Mass.: Privately Printed, (December 1851) , p. 13-14, citing Hubbard's History of New England, p. 632, Harris' edition.
  8. John Wingate Thornton, Mementos of the Swett Family, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=mv4UAAAAYAAJ . Roxbury, Mass.: Privately Printed, (December 1851) , p. 14-15, citing Hubbard's History of New England, p. 632-4, Harris' edition; ; Gookin's History of the Christian Indians in American Antiquarian Society's trans, i. 516; Williamson's Maine, i. 549-50; Belknap'a N. H., 82, but Williamson i. 550, says they were designed especially for the defence of Black Point and Winter Harbor.
  9. FamilySearch® Ancestral File™ v4.19,.
  10. John Wingate Thornton, Mementos of the Swett Family, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=mv4UAAAAYAAJ . Roxbury, Mass.: Privately Printed, (December 1851) , p. 15, citing a manuscript letter of Rev. Nathaniel Gookin, of Hampton, whose grandson Judge Daniel Gookin, of North Hampton, married Abigail Dearborn, a lineal descendant from Capt. Swett. Farmer's Belknap, 82.
  11. John Wingate Thornton, Mementos of the Swett Family, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=mv4UAAAAYAAJ . Roxbury, Mass.: Privately Printed, (December 1851) , p. 15, citing Col. Samuel Swett's notes.
  12. John Wingate Thornton, Mementos of the Swett Family, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=mv4UAAAAYAAJ . Roxbury, Mass.: Privately Printed, (December 1851) , p. 17.
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Benjamin Swett1

b. August 5, 1656
  • Last Edited: 31 Aug 2015

Citations

  1. John Wingate Thornton, Mementos of the Swett Family, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=mv4UAAAAYAAJ . Roxbury, Mass.: Privately Printed, (December 1851) , p. 17 Portions of this volume are confusing and misleading. Additional biographical material may be found in this book.
  2. John Wingate Thornton, Mementos of the Swett Family, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=mv4UAAAAYAAJ . Roxbury, Mass.: Privately Printed, (December 1851) , p. 17 gives date as 5 Aug 1656, as does Savage's Gen. Dict.
  3. William Richard Cutter, Genealogical and family history of western New York: a record of the achievements of her people in the making of a commonwealth and the building of a nation, Lewis Historical Publishing Co., (1912) , p. 344 gives birthdate as 20 May 1664.
  4. W. H. Whitmore, A Genealogy of the Norton family, with miscellaneous notes: reprinted from the New England Historical and genealogical register for July, 1859, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=pe3rBH7FUvcC&dq . Boston: Henry W. Dutton and Son, (1859) , p. 10.
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Benjamin Swett1

b. October 17, 1707
  • THIS LISTING HAS NOT YET BEEN AUDITED, AND MAY NOT BE ACCURATE; A.
  • Benjamin Swett was born on October 17, 1707.1
  • He was the son of John Swett and Bethiah Page.1
  • Last Edited: 13 Aug 2009

Citations

  1. John Wingate Thornton, Mementos of the Swett Family, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=mv4UAAAAYAAJ . Roxbury, Mass.: Privately Printed, (December 1851) , p. 17 Portions of this volume are confusing and misleading. Additional biographical material may be found in this book.
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Benjamin Swett1

b. November 17, 1710
  • Reference: 8032eeh
  • Last Edited: 18 Sep 2009

Family: Elizabeth Norton b. March 31, 1703

Citations

  1. John Wingate Thornton, Mementos of the Swett Family, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=mv4UAAAAYAAJ . Roxbury, Mass.: Privately Printed, (December 1851) , p. 20 Portions of this volume are confusing and misleading. Additional biographical material may be found in this book.
  2. William Richard Cutter, Genealogical and family history of western New York: a record of the achievements of her people in the making of a commonwealth and the building of a nation, Lewis Historical Publishing Co., (1912) , p. 345.
  3. John Wingate Thornton, Mementos of the Swett Family, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=mv4UAAAAYAAJ . Roxbury, Mass.: Privately Printed, (December 1851) , p. 20 gives the date as 2 May 1710.
  4. John Wingate Thornton, Mementos of the Swett Family, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=mv4UAAAAYAAJ . Roxbury, Mass.: Privately Printed, (December 1851) , p. 21.
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Benjamin Swett1

b. January 22, 1771
  • Last Edited: 18 Sep 2009

Citations

  1. William Richard Cutter, Genealogical and family history of western New York: a record of the achievements of her people in the making of a commonwealth and the building of a nation, Lewis Historical Publishing Co., (1912) , p. 345.
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Benjamin Swett1

b. January 22, 1660
  • THIS LISTING HAS NOT YET BEEN AUDITED, AND MAY NOT BE ACCURATE; A.
  • Benjamin Swett was born on January 22, 1660.1
  • He was the son of Joseph Swett and Elizabeth Taylor.1
  • Last Edited: 17 Nov 2009

Citations

  1. James Savage, A Genealogical Dictionary or The first Settlers of New England showing Three Generations or Those who came Before May, 1692 on the Basis of Farmer's Register, (1862) , vol. 4, p. 240.
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Benjamin Swett1

b. May 20, 1664
  • Reference: 4024h
  • Last Edited: 20 Sep 2015

Citations

  1. James Savage, A Genealogical Dictionary or The first Settlers of New England showing Three Generations or Those who came Before May, 1692 on the Basis of Farmer's Register, (1862) , vol. 4, p. 240.
  2. Mass. Newbury, Vital records of Newbury, Massachusetts, to the end of the year 1849 (Salem, Mass.: The Essex Institute, 1911), Vol. 1, p. 501.
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Benjamin Swett1

b. April 11, 1688
  • Father: John Swett1 b. October 20, 1648, d. March 17, 1716/17 or 1717/18
  • Mother: Mary Plummer1 b. February 8, 1648/49, d. January 12, 1713/14
  • THIS LISTING HAS NOT YET BEEN AUDITED, AND MAY NOT BE ACCURATE; A.
  • Benjamin Swett was born on April 11, 1688.1
  • He was the son of John Swett and Mary Plummer.1
  • Last Edited: 17 Nov 2009

Citations

  1. James Savage, A Genealogical Dictionary or The first Settlers of New England showing Three Generations or Those who came Before May, 1692 on the Basis of Farmer's Register, (1862) , vol. 4, p. 240.
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Benjamin H. Swett1

b. September 7, 1865
  • Last Edited: 10 Oct 2009

Citations

  1. RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project: JOHN SWETT OF NEWBURY, at http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bswett&id=I00695
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine