Everett L. Hammond

b. May 11, 1884
  • THIS LISTING HAS NOT YET BEEN AUDITED, AND MAY NOT BE ACCURATE; A.
  • Everett L. Hammond was born on May 11, 1884.
  • He was the son of Willie H. Hammond and Hattie Blood.
  • Last Edited: 13 Aug 2008
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Everett Lawrence Hammond1

b. between 1884 and 1885
  • Last Edited: 27 Dec 2021
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Frances Josephine Hammond1

b. April 17, 1812, d. October 28, 1895
  • Reference: 3074adcgdf
  • Last Edited: 27 Aug 2015

Family: Jedediah Leavens b. 1803, d. 1867

Citations

  1. Richard Thomas Huntington Samuel Gladding Huntington, The Huntington family in America: a genealogical memoir of the known descendants of Simon Huntington from 1633 to 1915, including those who have retained the family name, and many bearing other surnames, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=Yl9VAAAAMAAJ . Hartford, Connecticut: Huntington family association, (1915) , p. 552.
  2. "United States Census, 1850," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M68R-KB6 : accessed 27 August 2015), Jedediah Leavens, Norwich, New London, Connecticut, United States; citing family 1711, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  3. "United States Census, 1860," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MHR4-96K : accessed 27 August 2015), Jediah Levans, The Town Of Norwich, New London, Connecticut, United States; from "1860 U.S. Federal Census - Population," database, Fold3.com (http://www.fold3.com : n.d.); citing p. 119, household ID 861, NARA microfilm publication M653 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 803,090.
  4. "United States Census, 1870," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MN7G-8XF : accessed 27 August 2015), Frances Learens, Connecticut, United States; citing p. 66, family 615, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 545,613.
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Francis Hammond1

b. perhaps 1592
  • Last Edited: 30 Dec 2015

Citations

  1. Lois B. Goff, Goff-Davis ancestral lines: the ancestry of Moulton Babcock Goff and his wife Agnes Hopkins Davis, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=kShMAAAAMAAJ . Gateway Press, (1902) , p. 88.
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Frank H. Hammond

b. November 26, 1862
  • Last Edited: 4 Mar 2004

Citations

  1. Harrison Colby, A genealogy of the descendants of Abraham Colby and Elizabeth Blaisdell, his wife, who settled in Bow in 1768, , at https://archive.org/details/genealogyofdesce00colb . Concord, N.H.: Printed by the Republican Press Association, (1895) Microfilm #896944 of the Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, p. 94.
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Fred Nesmith Hammond

b. April 16, 1868, d. February 15, 1965
  • Last Edited: 12 Aug 2008

Family: Alice Eva Bartlett b. July 15, 1868, d. June 22, 1939

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George Hammond1

b. perhaps 1600
  • Reference: 24602b
  • Last Edited: 13 Jan 2016

Citations

  1. Frederick Stam Hammond, History and genealogies of the Hammond families in America, Vol. 1, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogi11hamm . Oneida, N. Y.: Ryan & Burkhart, (1902) , p. 39.
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George Asahel Hammond1

b. May 26, 1841
  • THIS LISTING HAS NOT YET BEEN AUDITED, AND MAY NOT BE ACCURATE; A.
  • George Asahel Hammond was born on May 26, 1841 in Hampton, Connecticut,

    He pursued his education in the public and high schools of Hampton and at the same time aided with the work of the home farm. Later he became a student in Williston Seminary, where he developed exceptional skill in penmanship and became an assistant tutor. He later engaged in teaching for a period of five years, spending three years as a teacher in Hampton and the remaining time in Canterbury and Abington. Soon after he had attained his majority a call was made for Hampton to furnish nine men for service in the Union army. Mr. Hammond, spurning any offer of a bounty, at once responded and his example was followed by eight others. thus preventing a draft in Hampton. He enrolled as a private on the 6th of September, 1862, and became a member of Company G, Twenty-sixth Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. He was promoted to orderly sergeant of his company, and following the death of his captain in the assault on Port Hudson, Louisiana, May 27, 1863, he was acting lieutenant, with which rank he served until mustered out at the end of his nine months’ term of enlistment, on the 17th of August, 1863. He afterward sent a substitute for three years’ service in the war and gave his attention to business. After a year devoted to teaching he went to Mansfield, Connecticut, and took up the business of silk manufacturing, with which he became thoroughly familiar in the mill of his uncle. Charles L. Bottum. He made it his purpose to thoroughly acquaint himself with every phase of the business and after eight years’ connection there with he was admitted to the firm/as was his cousin, Charles C. Knowlton, who had been previously in business in Boston. In 1878 Mr. Hammond withdrew from active connection with the Mansfield business and on the first of that year established a silk manufactory in Putnam, his partners in the undertaking being George M. Morse, who became a special partner, and Mr. Knowlton, who became an active partner. They organized under the firm style of Hammond, Knowlton & Company and opened a mill on the west side of the river. Success attended the new undertaking and after three years Mr. Morse sold his interest to his partners and in 1885 a removal was made to the Harris mill, to which large additions were made in 1892. more than doubling the productive capacity.. The company always maintained the highest standards in the excellence of the product and all of the sewing machines operated on the grounds of the World's Columbian Exposition at Chicago in 1893 used silk supplied exclusively by Hammond, Knowlton & Company, the firm receiving a medal for producing the best machine twist and sewing silk. Mr. Hammond felt the greatest pride in making the output of the house standard in every particular and was determined that no silk manufacturing establishment should surpass his own in the quality of goods placed upon the market. The house soon gained a well merited reputation and its trade steadily increased. Mr. Hammond has always been most deeply interested in the welfare and progress of Putnam and cooperated in many movements which have led to its material development. He was one of the first champions of the establishment of electric light and water systems, and electric lights were installed in his home and factory before they were established in any other buildings of Putnam. For several years he was the president of the Putnam Electric Light & Power Company and he was also a prime mover in the organization of the Putnam Foundry & Machine Corporation, serving as a member of its board of directors for five years. He has also been president of the Putnam Box Company and the Hampton Silk Company. He was also instrumental in the formation of the Putnam Business Men's Association, of which he served for
    some time as president.

    Mr. Hammond has always been a republican in his political views yet has not been bitterly aggressive nor unduly partisan. He has ever recognized the duties and obligations as well as the privileges of citizenship and has been ready to aid in movements for the general good or to fill public ofiices if his fellow townsmen desired his services in that direction. He has done effective work as an official in connection with the schools of his town and in 1876 he was elected to represent Mansfield in the general assembly at Hartford, where he was made a member of several important committees, including that on school funds. In 1885 and 1886 Putnam elected him as its representative to the general assembly, where he was made chairman of the committee on manufactures and a member of the railroads committee. In the previous year he had introduced a bill authorizing the organization of the Putnam Water Company, which was passed by the house. He gave thoughtful and earnest consideration to all questions which came up for settlement, stanchly supporting any measure which he believed would prove of benefit to the commonwealth and as stanchly opposed any bill that he had reason to feel was detrimental to the best interests of' the community. He was chosen as a member of the state central committee of he republican party in 1888 and continued to serve through ten successive years, exercising marked infiuence in its councils. In 1893 he was made a commissioner to the World's Columbian Exposition. In 1896 he was chosen a member of the electoral college which made William McKinley president of the United States, and he was a delegate to the national republican convention in Philadelphia which renominated Major McKinley for the highest executive oflice in the land. In 1900 he was a delegate to the Philadelphia convention of his party and nominated Theodore Roosevelt for vice president. He was again a delegate in Chicago in 1904, and in 1908 and in 1912. In the meantime, in 1905, he was made a member of the house of representatives in the state legislature and served on the committees on railroads and education. He was likewise chairman of the committee on capitol, furniture and grounds, before which committee came bills aggregating between two and three million dollars. In 1911 he was elected to the state senate and was chairman of the finance committee and education. He has ever been most deeply interested in the cause of public education and for fifteen years was chairman of the school committee, while for more than thirty years he was a member of the school board. For two years he served as a member of the executive committee of the Home Market Club of Boston and thus formed the acquaintance of many of the brightest minds of New England. Mr. Hammond joined Israel Putnam Lodge, 33, I. O. O. F., as one of its charter members, served as treasurer for a number of years and was the first member honored with that ofiice. He belongs as well to Putnam Lodge, No. 18, A. O. U. W., and to Putnam Council, No. 340, of the Royal Arcanum. In Masonry, too, he has attained high rank and is now affiliated with Quinebaug Lodge, No. 106, A. F. & A. M; Putnam Chapter, No. 41, R. A. M; Columbia Commandery, No. 4, K. T., of Norwich; and Sphinx Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Hartford. He has also been identified for many years with A. G. Warner Post, No. 54, G. A. R., of which he is a past commander, and through his association with that organization he keeps in close touch with his old army comrades. One of the most salient features of his entire career has been his fidelity to duty, and his course has ever measured up to the highest standards of manhood and citizenship.1
  • He was the son of George Robinson Hammond and Sarah Elizabeth Bottum.2
  • The census of 1850 shows:
    George A. Hammond, 9, attending school; in the household of
    George R. Hammond, 36, a farmer with $7000 real estate; and
    Sarah E. Hammond, 37;
    living at Hampton, Connecticut.2

  • Last Edited: 1 Nov 2012

Citations

  1. Allen B. Lincoln, A Modern History of Windham County, Connecticut: A Windham County Treasure Book, Chicago: S.J. Clarke Publishing Company, (1920) , Vol. 2, p. 1203.
  2. 1850 United States. Census Office. 7th census, Population schedules of the seventh census of the United States, 1850, Washington, District of Columbia: National Archives. Central Plains Region, (1964) , Census Place: Hampton, Windham, Connecticut; Roll: M432_51; Page: 398A; Image: 608. (With few exceptions, names are listed exactly as they appear on the census.).
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George H. Hammond

b. April 4, 1872
  • Reference: 0224bbhfb
  • Last Edited: 24 Apr 2010

Family: Lulu Wallace of Manchester, N.H. b. perhaps 1874

Citations

  1. 1880 United States. Census Office. 10th census, 1880 federal population census, Washington, District of Columbia: National Archives and Records Service, ([19--]) , FHL Film 1254765; National Archives Film T9-0765; Page 51D.
  2. Guy S. Rix, History and Genealogy of the Eastman Family in America, , at https://archive.org/stream/historyandgenea00rixgoog . Concord, N.H.: (1901) , p. 908.
  3. 1880 United States. Census Office. 10th census, 1880 federal population census, Washington, District of Columbia: National Archives and Records Service, ([19--]) , Census Place: Bow, Merrimack, New Hampshire; Roll T9_765; Family History Film: 1254765; Page: 50.1000; Enumeration District: 162; Image: 0705.
  4. Kathy Pinciaro, "Ancestors and their Descendants - Master Index," e-mail message from e-mail address to Steven G. Levine, 9/16/2008 2:04 PM.
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George Henry Hammond

b. March 28, 1856, d. before 1901
  • Last Edited: 22 Apr 2010

Citations

  1. Harrison Colby, A genealogy of the descendants of Abraham Colby and Elizabeth Blaisdell, his wife, who settled in Bow in 1768, , at https://archive.org/details/genealogyofdesce00colb . Concord, N.H.: Printed by the Republican Press Association, (1895) Microfilm #896944 of the Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, p. 89.
  2. Guy S. Rix, History and Genealogy of the Eastman Family in America, , at https://archive.org/stream/historyandgenea00rixgoog . Concord, N.H.: (1901) , p. 903.
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George Robinson Hammond1

b. May 28, 1814, d. January 16, 1892
  • THIS LISTING HAS NOT YET BEEN AUDITED, AND MAY NOT BE ACCURATE; A.
  • George Robinson Hammond was born on May 28, 1814 in Hampton, Connecticut. He engaged extensively in farming, stock raising and dairying, and also taught school for five years. He served in the state militia with the rank of captain and he filled various civic offices and was a representative of his town in the state legislature of 1867. His entire life was dominated by his Christian faith, his membership being in the Congregational church, in which he served as deacon for many years. He voted with the whig party until its dissolution, when he joined the ranks of the new republican party and continued one of its supporters until his death.2
  • He was the son of Colonel Asahel Hammond and Betsey Robinson.
  • George married Sarah E. Bottum on March 23, 1840 in Mansfield, Connecticut.3
  • The census of 1850 shows: George R. Hammond, 36, a farmer with $7000 real estate; and Sarah E. Hammond, 37; listed with George A. Hammond, Charles S. Hammond and Wm. H. Hammond
    living at Hampton, Connecticut.4

  • George died on January 16, 1892 at age 77.1
  • He was buried in Hammond or North Cemetery, Hampton, Connecticut.1
  • Last Edited: 1 Nov 2012

Family: Sarah Elizabeth Bottum b. January 12, 1813, d. April 14, 1877

Citations

  1. http://www.ctgenweb.org/county/cowindham/records/cemetery/hampton/hamptonhammondcem.htm
  2. Allen B. Lincoln, A Modern History of Windham County, Connecticut: A Windham County Treasure Book, Chicago: S.J. Clarke Publishing Company, (1920) , Vol. 2, p. 1203.
  3. http://dunhamwilcox.net/ct/mansfield_m2.htm
  4. 1850 United States. Census Office. 7th census, Population schedules of the seventh census of the United States, 1850, Washington, District of Columbia: National Archives. Central Plains Region, (1964) , Census Place: Hampton, Windham, Connecticut; Roll: M432_51; Page: 398A; Image: 608. (With few exceptions, names are listed exactly as they appear on the census.).
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Grace Hammond1

b. perhaps 1569, d. after November 15, 1604
  • Last Edited: 30 Oct 2015

Citations

  1. Frederick Stam Hammond, History and genealogies of the Hammond families in America, Vol. 1, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogi11hamm . Oneida, N. Y.: Ryan & Burkhart, (1902) , p. 39.
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Grace Hammond1

b. perhaps 1532
  • Last Edited: 30 Oct 2015

Citations

  1. Frederick Stam Hammond, History and genealogies of the Hammond families in America, Vol. 1, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogi11hamm . Oneida, N. Y.: Ryan & Burkhart, (1902) , p. 33.
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Grace Hammond1

b. perhaps 1601
  • Last Edited: 30 Dec 2015

Citations

  1. Lois B. Goff, Goff-Davis ancestral lines: the ancestry of Moulton Babcock Goff and his wife Agnes Hopkins Davis, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=kShMAAAAMAAJ . Gateway Press, (1902) , p. 88.
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Hannah Hammond

b. 1800, d. about 1838
  • Last Edited: 15 Aug 2007

Family: John Clement b. November 18, 1789, d. July 13, 1827

Citations

  1. Harrison Colby, A genealogy of the descendants of Abraham Colby and Elizabeth Blaisdell, his wife, who settled in Bow in 1768, , at https://archive.org/details/genealogyofdesce00colb . Concord, N.H.: Printed by the Republican Press Association, (1895) Microfilm #896944 of the Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, p. 87.
  2. Guy S. Rix, History and Genealogy of the Eastman Family in America, , at https://archive.org/stream/historyandgenea00rixgoog . Concord, N.H.: (1901) , p. 507.
  3. Harrison Colby, A genealogy of the descendants of Abraham Colby and Elizabeth Blaisdell, his wife, who settled in Bow in 1768, , at https://archive.org/details/genealogyofdesce00colb . Concord, N.H.: Printed by the Republican Press Association, (1895) Microfilm #896944 of the Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, p. 90.
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Hannah Hammond

b. April 26, 1762
  • Reference: 3074adcfb
  • THIS LISTING HAS NOT YET BEEN AUDITED, AND MAY NOT BE ACCURATE; A.
  • Hannah Hammond was born on April 26, 1762.
  • She was the daughter of Asa Hammond and Lois Durkee.
  • Last Edited: 26 Jan 2009
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Hannah Hammond

b. December 28, 1771
  • THIS LISTING HAS NOT YET BEEN AUDITED, AND MAY NOT BE ACCURATE; A.
  • Hannah Hammond was born on December 28, 1771.
  • She was the daughter of Asa Hammond and Lois Durkee.
  • Last Edited: 26 Jan 2009
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