Abraham Perley1

b. December 24, 1749, d. August 20, 1775
  • THIS LISTING HAS NOT YET BEEN AUDITED, AND MAY NOT BE ACCURATE; A.
  • Abraham Perley was born on December 24, 1749.1
  • He was the son of Samuel Perley and Ruth How.1
  • Abraham Perley was a physician at New Gloucester, Cumberland County, Maine.1
  • On August 20, 1775, at age 25, he made his will and devised to Samuel Perley, Jr., of Seabrook, all his property, some of which was land in New Gloucester which he bought of Deacon Daniel Merrill. Rev. Samuel Perley was executor, and Jacob Green and Samuel Perley were witnesses to the will, which was proved 29 May 1776. He died of consumption, probably at his brother's, in Seabrook, Rockingham County, New Hampshire.1
  • Last Edited: 23 Aug 2009

Citations

  1. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 48.
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Abraham Perley1

b. May 26, 1777
  • Last Edited: 16 Sep 2009

Family 1: Rebecca Humphrey b. April 21, 1780, d. August 21, 1816

Family 2: Lois Burnham b. June 15, 1781, d. October 11, 1862

Citations

  1. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 98.
  2. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 193.
  3. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 194.
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Abraham Perley1

b. November 17, 1769
  • Last Edited: 2 Apr 2010

Citations

  1. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 146.
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Abraham Perley1

b. November 30, 1779
  • Last Edited: 2 Apr 2010

Citations

  1. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 146.
  2. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 295.
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Abraham Perley1

b. October 23, 1793
  • Last Edited: 19 Feb 2015

Citations

  1. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 164.
  2. Find a Grave, at http://www.findagrave.com/, Created by: Bill Boyington
    Record added: Jul 05, 2007
    Find A Grave Memorial# 20306484.
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Alice Perley1

b. 1673 or 1674, d. July 19, 1746
  • Last Edited: 21 Aug 2009

Family: Samson Howe b. November 13, 1682, d. September 3, 1736

Citations

  1. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 13.
  2. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 14.
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Alice Perley1

b. June 2, 1710, d. about 1749
  • THIS LISTING HAS NOT YET BEEN AUDITED, AND MAY NOT BE ACCURATE; A.
  • Alice Perley was born on June 2, 1710.2
  • She was the daughter of Isaac Perley and Frances (?)1
  • Her uncle Jeremiah Perley was appointed her guardian 29 Dec 1729/30.2
  • Alice married Thomas Foster on July 14, 1731.2
  • Alice married Benjamin Rogers on October 11, 1734.2
  • Alice died about 1749.2
  • Last Edited: 31 Aug 2009

Family 1: Thomas Foster b. May 23, 1708, d. 1733

Family 2: Benjamin Rogers b. October 24, 1714, d. March 23, 1761

Citations

  1. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 23.
  2. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 43.
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Alice Greenwood Perley1

b. June 14, 1889
  • Last Edited: 28 Jul 2016

Citations

  1. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , pp. 592-3.
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Allen Perley1

b. between January 1, 1608 and April 1, 1608, d. December 28, 1675
  • Reference: 3846
  • Allen Perley was born between January 1, 1608 and April 1, 1608 in Wales.1
  • He immigrated in 1630 or 1631, coming in the Planter in the fleet with Governor Winthrop, and located in " Charlestowne Village," on land which is now included in the city of Woburn and called "Button-end," near a tract of meadow, marked in the cut A A A, which has been known for two and a half centuries as "Parly meddowe," through which meanders a brook spanned by a plank bridge, marked B, six and a half feet wide, and known as "Parly brook." The name is found in probate records, and in the colonial records, 2:75, as it is spelled above; and it is pronounced by the citizens of Woburn today as it is here spelled.

    Why he relinquished his settlement is a matter of conjecture. The rigors of his first winter were extreme; the sufferings of the settlers were intense. "The weather," reads Lendrum's History of the American Revolution, "held tolerable until the 24th December, but the cold then came on with violence. Such a Christmas eve they had never seen before. From that time to the 10th of February their chief care was to keep themselves warm, and as comfortable in other respects as their scant provisions would permit. They were so short of provisions that many were obliged to live upon clams, mussels, and other shell-fish, with ground nuts and acorns, instead of bread. One that came to the Governor's house to complain of his sufferings, was prevented, being informed that even there the last batch was in the oven. The poorer sort were much exposed, lying in tents and miserable hovels, and many died of scurvy and other distempers." Such an experience would dishearten the most resolute; in fact, "some of the Board of Assistants," according to Bancroft's History of the United States, "men who had been trusted as the inseparable companions of the common misery or common success, disheartened by the scenes of woe, sailed for England." Many others also went home for the same cause.

    The statement in Lambert's History of the New Haven Colony, that in 1034 "the colonies at Watertown, Dorchester and Newtown [Cambridge] had become so crowded by the accessions of new planters, that many left," affords another suggestion. He may have sold his grant and improvements, all his local rights and interests, feeling assured of finding another location as good or better. The great attraction to Boston and vicinity was the learned, wealthy, and noble Governor Winthrop, but our ancestor seems to have found more attraction in the younger Winthrop at Ipswich. However it may have been with our ancestor, whatever his reason or motive for leaving, he remained long enough to stamp his name indelibly upon the territory and to record the unquestioned fact of his possession. According to the manuscript chart of the family, "From thence he moved to Ipswich in 1634." By the town records, he was in Ipswich in 1635.

    But before identifying himself with Ipswich history, he visited England; for he was there "2o Aprilis, l035," according to a record in the Augmentation office, London, and set sail that month for New England. He located in Ipswich, on High street, a short distance from Governor Bradstreet and the Waldo family. The place was the second houselot northwest of the High-street cemetery, and it is remarkable that, as of 1906, it had the same shape and area that it had then, two and a half centuries before. Alexander Knight's homestead was on the northwest, George Smith's on the southeast, "a drift way" on the northeast, and High street on the southwest. As of 1906, the new part of the cemetery was on the northeast.

    It was originally a picturesque spot. Located on the western slope of Town hill and agreeably elevated from the street, it commanded a fine view of the verdant slopes of Turkey and Timber hills and the ridge-range of houses along Scott's lane, the present Washington street. The deep frontage of his lot afforded ample opportunity to arrange a spacious avenue from the street to his dwelling, with flowering plants and shrubbery on either side, after the fashion of the average gentleman of the old country. Whatever he did in the matter, his selection of grounds of such possible improvements, attest his good taste and judgment, educated, no doubt, by the experiences of his early life. There he brought his young wife and began the business of life anew; there most of his children were born; thence have radiated the family name and influence.

    He resided there about seventeen years, selling, 3 Sep 1652, for £27, his "dwelling house and homestead" to Walter Roper, carpenter, of Topsfield. Mr. Roper, 15 Jul 1680, devised his "house, barn and homestead," valued at £$0, (the "carpenter" having built a new house?), to his son John. John Roper died 27 Nov., 1709, leaving by will dated 22 Nov 1709, his "mansion house, barn and homestead," valued at £100, to his "loving cousin Benjamin Dutch." Mr. Dutch divided the property into half parts, "through the chimney from top to bottom," and 3 Feb., 1737, sold the northwestern half to John Browne, 4th, of Ipswich, and 16 Jun 1741, the southeastern half to Nathaniel Lord, Jr., of Ipswich, hatter. Mr. Browne, 18 Jan 1776, devised his part to his widow, who, as Lydia Thornton, 23 Jun 1790, sold the premises to the same Nathaniel Lord, Jr., as above, who then owned the whole original estate. Mr. Lord, 8 Aug 1796, devised it to his sons Abraham and Isaac. Abraham died intestate and childless, and in the division of his estate, 9 Oct 1811, his interest in this property was settled upon his brother Isaac, who then owned the whole. Isaac, 17 May 1825, devised it to his son Levi, who, 4 Jun 1869, left it to his son George Edward Lord, who in 1906, owned it and resided there.

    Mr. Perley was a large land-holder, and besides possessions in Essex, Rowley and Boxford, he had in Ipswich, in 1635, land at Heartbreak hill; in 1 Mar 1640, a road from Rowley to Salem was laid out "over the falls at Mile river and by marked trees over Mr. Appleton's meadowe, called Parlye meadowe"; he was a commoner in 1641; he owned a houselot on Mill street in 1642, the street being now called Washington, and the lot being traversed by Mt. Pleasant street; he had a planting lot on Town hill in 1645; "att a meeting of the seven men the 8th (5) 1651" there was "granted to Alen Perlye (in exchange for Thirty acres more or less at Chebacco lyeing on the west syde of his meddowe) the sume of forty-five acres of upland lyeing beyond Mr. Winthropes farme Joyneing up to some of the ppriatyes thereabouts"; he was granted 10 acres by the town in 1660; he owned one and a half shares in Plum Island in 1664, and, at some time, five acres of upland and marsh called Reedy marsh. In I670, he had liberty of the town to cut timber for a "barne."

    He was admitted to the privileges of freemen, 18 May, 1642; was a grand juror 25 Sept 1600, and at various times was witness to legal documents, and served on important committees; he was upon the coroner's jury in the case of his neighbor, Alexander Knight's child Nathaniel, who, while alone, was so burned that he died in a few hours. He was excused from training in 1656 and again in 1664. A court record reads: 1669, Sept. 28, Tobiah Colman vs. Allen Perley, for taking up and detaining his horse. Verdict for pl. 50s, no costs—--a case probably wherein the law regarding field-drivers was not rigidly followed. In November, 1662, there was Allen Perley vs. Henry Batchelder, "for not giving him lawful assurance of land" located near a pond, and Batchelder lost.

    Mr. Ferley was a man of considerable importance, and was held in good esteem. The location of his home, as referred to above, and his clear-penned signature to his will, though he was then nearly seventy years of age, witness a gentle birth, experience and character. The presence of pewter upon his table was a mark of more than ordinary social rank, and the probate inventory of his estate shows his business connections to have been with the honored and best citizens. Coming to America with the Puritans in 1630, he must have been a cordial sympathizer with them in their persecutions and their faith, although it was not till late in life that he was received into full church-fellowship. He and his wife joined the church 12 Aug 1674.

    Doubtless Mr. Perley had a home prepared on the grant of 1651 beyond Mr. Winthrop's farm, when he sold his town estate to Mr. Roper. The site of the latter residence was, as of 1906, still pointed out in Ipswich, south of the residence of Charles M. Perley. There they lived and labored and loved for a quarter of a century; there they saw their children grow up about them respected and useful citizens ; there they were honored; there they practised sobriety and earned their wealth; and when the sun of their life glowed in the western horizon, they rested in the hope of a blessed immortality. The place of their interment is probably near their first home.2
    BUTTON-END AND HOW TO GET THERE.
    "Sta." locates steam-car Stations; the line of small circles, a trolley line. The small black squares locate houses-1. the property of E. H. Perley. 6. of M. V. B. Perley. 2. the residence of E. H. Perley. 4. of Mrs, Almira IV Knight. 5. of John M. Perley. 3. the Rectory.
    The estate as it was in November, 1903. The proud little white rooster, back near the big elm, shows the elevation at that point above the street. There was an old well, later filled, about half way of the fence between the western corner of the house and the street; and it was probably Allan, "our father which gave us the well, and drank thereof himself, and his children, and his cattle." The house stands about a rod from the street; the northwestern part was probably a century or more old at the time of the photo; the southeastern was built in 1847, when the whole structure was moved forward probably its width, in order to be on a line with the house next to it. The elms, front and rear, are fine American specimens, old and symmetrical, and afforded a gracious shade from summer heat.
  • Allen married Susanna Bokesen, or Bokenson in 1635.1
  • Allen died on December 28, 1675 in Ipswich, Massachusetts,

    His Will reads:

    In the name of God, Amen! I, Allen Perley, of Ipswich, in the County of Essex, in New England, being by the good blessing of God in good health and enjoying my understanding and memory, yet sensible of my mortal and changeable condition here, and desirous to set my house in order, do therefore make my last will and testament:

    First. I commit my soul into the hands of Jesus Christ, my blessed Savior and Redeemer; my body to be decently buried in what place the Lord shall allot for me to depart this life, in assured hope of a joyful resurrection at the last day.

    And for my outward estate that God has graciously given me I thus dispose: My three elder sons, viz: John Perlye, Thomas Perley and Samuel Perlye, taking their liberty at the age of twenty-one to leave me at, yet I have given unto them three parts of the land beyond Bachelours brook (each of them a part which they are possessed of and do enjoy) excepting the great meadow, which I do reserve. And all that part of land which was Nathaniel's, my son who is departed this life, which I do give and bequeath unto my two daughters Sarah and Martha Perley.

    And my house and the use of my land and the great meadow I give and bequeath unto my son Timothy, when he shall attain to the age of twenty-three years, provided still my beloved wife Susanna shall have one room to her own use during her natural life.

    Item. I give unto my beloved wife all my cattle and movable goods and one-third part of the land bequeathed to my son Timothy during her natural life for her comfortable maintenance.

    And after her decease my will is, the house and land be unto my son Timothy, and the cattle and movable goods be equally divided among all my children then living.

    And my will and mind is, that if my said wife shall marry, that then the land and room in the house be unto my son Timothy and he to pay unto his mother seaven pounds a year during her life.

    And I do make my beloved wife sole executrix of this my last will.

    My will further is, that my son Timothy at the age of 23 years shall have the use of part of the stock to the value of thirty pounds during the life of my wife and then to be returned to be divided as is above expressed.

    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the 23 of June Anno Domini, 1670.

    Signed and sealed and Published

    as his last will in presence of us:
    Robert Lord.
    Mary Lord.

    Codicil.

    The 16th day of November, 1671, I, Allen Perley, as an explanation of that clause in my will within mentioned, concerning my wife, having given unto her my cattle and movables during her natural life, besides the thirds of land a room in the house and in case of her marriage to leave the room in the house and land and to have seven pounds a year paid her by my son Timothy but nothing spoken about the cattle and movable goods,?-- my will is that she return also the cattle and movables to be divided among my children, as is expressed in said will.

    Witness my hand the day and year above written.

    Signed and Sealed and Published in presence of us: ALLAN PERLEY. [L.S.] Robert Lord. Mary Lord.

    February the 3d, 1675.

    Before our Honored Majesurates, Mr. Samuel Symond, Dep. Gov. and Major-Gen. Denison, the Clerke being present, this will and addition was proved to be the last will and testament of Allen Perley, by the oaths of Robert Lord, Senior, and Mary Lord.

    As Attest, Robert Lord, Clerk.

    THE INVENTORY of the estate of Allan Perley, deceased, the 28th of December last past taken and appraised by us whose names are underwritten, the 19th of January, 1675.

    In primis.
    qwTABLE rules="rows"wq
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqThe house, barn and orchard with the homestead,qwbrwqgreat meadow and meadow about home withqwbrwqsome little upland belonging to the meadow,qwTD align="right"wq£, qwTD align="right"wq201, qwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqThe half part of that land as was Nathaniel Perley's, qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq20, qwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqThe meadow that was Nathaniel's, qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq16, qwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wq2 Oxen,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq10, qwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wq3 Cows,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq10, qwTD align="right"wq10, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wq2 Cows,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq5, qwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wq1 Heifer,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq1, qwTD align="right"wq15, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wq1 Calf,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq1, qwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wq1 Horse, Mare and Colt,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq5, qwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wq20 Sheep,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq8, qwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wq9 Swine,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq4, qwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqHis wearing clothes,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq4, qwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wq3 Beds with what do belong to them,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq7, qwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wq2 pairs Sheets,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq1, qwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqTable-cloth, Napkins,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq1, qwTD align="right"wq2, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wq4 Pillow-cases,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq10, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wq6 Trays,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq3, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wq6 Trays,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq3, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqPewter,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq1, qwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wq20 pounds Butter,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq10, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqCheese,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq5, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wq20 pounds Cotton Wool,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq16, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wq20 " Sheep's Wool,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq1, qwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wq12 " Woolen Yarn,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq1, qwTD align="right"wq10, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqLinen Yarn,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq1, qwTD align="right"wq10, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqGuns,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq2, qwTD align="right"wq10, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wq5 bushels Wheat,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq1, qwTD align="right"wq10, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wq4 " Rye,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq16, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqIndian Corn,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq3, qwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqBeef,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq1, qwTD align="right"wq10, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wq2 Iron pots and a mortar,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq1, qwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqBrass,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq15, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqPans, dishes and spoons and some small things,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq10, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqPail, Half-bushel, Half-peck,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq4, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqA churn, a barrel, a meat-tub and some old tubs and a barrel,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq10, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqTrammels, Frying-pan, Pot-hooksqwbrwqand a gridiron, Fire-pan and Tongs,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq15, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wq3 axes and a hoe,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq0, qwTD align="right"wq10, qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqAn old Cart, Tumbrel, Wheels, Plow,qwbrwqYoke and irons, belonging to them,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq1,qwTD align="right"wq10,qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqAn Auger, a Chisel, 2 pair Fork-tines,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq0,qwTD align="right"wq4,qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqA Rope,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq0,qwTD align="right"wq2,qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqA pair of Bellows,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq0,qwTD align="right"wq2,qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqChairs and Cushion,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq0,qwTD align="right"wq3,qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqA Table, Cotton wheel and form,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq0,qwTD align="right"wq5,qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqA smoothing Iron,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq0,qwTD align="right"wq2,qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqSieves,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq0,qwTD align="right"wq2,qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqA Bible and a Psalm book,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq0,qwTD align="right"wq6,qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqSacks,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq0,qwTD align="right"wq2,qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqHay and Flax, qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq3,qwTD align="right"wq5,qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqA Chest,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq0,qwTD align="right"wq4,qwTD align="right"wq6
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqCards,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq0,qwTD align="right"wq4,qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wq5 Bushels of Barley,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq1,qwTD align="right"wq0,qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="left"wqA Boar,qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq3,qwTD align="right"wq10,qwTD align="right"wq0
    qwTRwqqwTD align="right"wq
    Total [according to the record], qwTD align="right"wqqwTD align="right"wq320,qwTD align="right"wq2,qwTD align="right"wq6
    qwTRwqqwtdwqqwTD colspan="3"wqJohn Kimball,qwbrwqNehemiah Abbott.
    qwtrwqqwtd colspan="4"wq.
    qwTrwqqwtd align="center"wqDEBTS OF THE DECEASED.qwtd colspan="3"wq
    qwtrwqqwtdwqMr. Winthrop,qwtdwq qwtd align="right"wq6, qwtd align="right"wq3, qwtd align="right"wq0
    qwtrwqqwtdwqTo the Constable,qwtdwq qwtd align="right"wq2, qwtd align="right"wq14, qwtd align="right"wq0
    qwtrwqqwtdwq    "   Dea. Goodhue,qwtdwq qwtd align="right"wq0, qwtd align="right"wq18, qwtd align="right"wq0
    qwtrwqqwtdwq    "   Capt. Currier,qwtdwq qwtd align="right"wq0, qwtd align="right"wq10, qwtd align="right"wq0
    qwtrwqqwtdwqMr. Cobbett,qwtdwq qwtd align="right"wq0, qwtd align="right"wq11, qwtd align="right"wq0
    qwtrwqqwtdwqThos. Perley,qwtdwq qwtd align="right"wq3, qwtd align="right"wq12, qwtd align="right"wq0
    qwtrwqqwtdwqJob French,qwtdwq qwtd align="right"wq0, qwtd align="right"wq6, qwtd align="right"wq0
    qwtrwqqwtdwqDea. Knowlton,qwtdwq qwtd align="right"wq0, qwtd align="right"wq4, qwtd align="right"wq6
    qwtrwqqwtdwqJames Howe, senior,qwtdwq qwtd align="right"wqqwuwq0, qwtd align="right"wqqwuwq3, qwtd align="right"wqqwuwq6qw/uwq
    qwtrwqqwtdwq qwtdwq, qwtd align="right"wq15, qwtd align="right"wq2, qwtd align="right"wq0qw/tablewq.1
    Allan Perley's signature on his will
  • Last Edited: 28 Jan 2021

Family: Susanna Bokesen, or Bokenson b. perhaps 1616, d. February 11, 1692

Citations

  1. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 1.
  2. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 1-7.
  3. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 7.
  4. Juliet Porter, A Porter Pedigree, , at https://books.google.com/books?id=PXxIAAAAMAAJ . Worcester, Mass.: (1907) , pp. 42-6.
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Allen Perley1

b. March 1, 1687/88
  • Last Edited: 22 Dec 2021

Citations

  1. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 20.
  2. https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/2495/images/41254_265538-00282
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Allen Perley1

b. April 14, 1714
  • Last Edited: 9 Dec 2021

Citations

  1. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 31.
  2. http://ma-vitalrecords.org/MA/Essex/Boxford/Images/Boxford_B071.shtml
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Allen Perley1

b. May 9, 1718, d. October 14, 1804
  • Reference: 3846fbb
  • THIS LISTING HAS NOT YET BEEN AUDITED, AND MAY NOT BE ACCURATE; A.
  • Allen Perley was born on May 9, 1718 on the immigrant-ancestral estate, "Ipswich Farms."2
  • He was the son of Stephen Perley and Hannah Coker.1
  • Jeremiah Perley was appointed guardian of Allen and Sarah, 26 Jul 1736, when they were over fourteen years of age.1
  • Allen married Martha Fowler on November 10, 1757, daughter of John and Mercy (How) Fowler.2
  • Mr. Perley lived upon the parental estate, till about the time of his marriage, when he became owner of the house, hitherto that of his brother-in-law, Samuel Perley. The house was built by the first Samuel, and was located on a site near the residence of the late Silas Per1ey. It was, in 1767, removed across the brook there, and sold, in 1784 to Capt. Abraham How, who occupied it till he was succeeded by his son Abel Howe, who reared there a large and interesting family of children, and with the land adjoining was sold, 24 Feb 1870, for $250, to M. V. B. Perley, who razed it and opened the land to other land contiguous.

    He returned to his early home, upon the sale to Capt. How, and became a farmer of means and importance. He, as did his father and grandfather, attended church at Topsfield and thus was much more identified with the Topsfield than with the Ipswich history, being from the former center two miles, and six from the latter.

    He was a member of Capt. Abraham How's company, that marched toward the scene of conflict, on that truly historic day at Concord and Lexington, proceeding twelve miles and drawing pay for a day's service.

    Probably Mr. Perley was never a member of a church, but after the Parish church was organized in 1746, he owned a pew.3
    He was made guardian of his sister Hovey's children 22 Mar 1705, and his autograph, here shown, was attached to his bond as guardian.
  • He died on October 14, 1804 at age 86. He made his will 3 Apr 1804; witnesses: James Smith, Timothy Morse, Jr., and Timothy Morse, and executors: Lt. John Fowler and his son Jacob Perley. It was proved 5 Nov 1804. The probate value of his estate was $4375, personal $390, real $3985.

    His widow had the improvement of the east end of the house, the west half of the barn, half of the homestead and half of the salt marsh, during her life; and also half of his live stock, and all his provisions in the house or growing in the field, all his furniture and money he had at his decease.

    His son Allen had an adjoining farm that was bought of Joseph Fisk.

    His grandsons, Allen's sons, had half the live stock.

    His son John had all his lands in Boxford, about twenty acres in Ipswich, on which John afterwards lived; his sons John and Jacob had all his salt marsh, lying in Ipswich, after their mother's use; his son Stephen had $1 paid by Jacob; his daughter Deborah had $150 paid by John; his daughter Hannah had $150 paid by John; his daughter Sarah, had, after her mother's death, the income of a third of his real estate, called the Home lot, except cutting or selling wood more than enough for one tire, till she married, when Jacob was to give her $200 in lieu of it. She had, also, while unmarried, the use of the lower rooms in the east end of his house and the chamber over the back room, and a third of the barn.

    His sons, John and Jacob, had his pew, and his wife and daughter Sarah had privileges to sit in it; his sons had his clothing; his son Jacob had the remainder, personal and real, which included the farm on which he lived—Allan's later home.

    qwcenterwqIn Memory ofqwbrwqMR ALLEN PERLEY,qwbrwqwho diedqwbrwqOct 14, 1804;qwbrwqAged 86.qwbrwqqwfont "-2"wqMy children all, come view my grave:qwbrwqPrepare to follow me.qwbrwqAnd If your peace he made with GodqwbrwqThen happy you shall be.qw/fontwqqw/centerwq.4
  • Last Edited: 24 Aug 2009

Family: Martha Fowler b. November 1, 1738, d. September 3, 1819

Citations

  1. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 38.
  2. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 63.
  3. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 64.
  4. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 64-65.
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Allen Perley1

b. May 11, 1746
  • THIS LISTING HAS NOT YET BEEN AUDITED, AND MAY NOT BE ACCURATE; A.
  • Allen Perley was born on May 11, 1746.1
  • He was the son of Maj. Asa Perley and Susannah Low.1
  • Allen died in infancy.1
  • Last Edited: 24 Aug 2009

Citations

  1. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 57.
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Allen Perley1

b. June 9, 1750, d. December, 1829
  • THIS LISTING HAS NOT YET BEEN AUDITED, AND MAY NOT BE ACCURATE; A.
  • Allen Perley was born on June 9, 1750 in Boxford, Massachusetts.2
  • He was the son of Maj. Asa Perley and Susannah Low.1
  • He sojourned in Ward, now Auburn, and removed to Gardner. The attraction to that section about that time was the movement in real estate. Massachusetts had paid her soldiers of the French and Indian Wars in wild land in the northern middle part of the State, and farms and sections could be bought in many instances very cheap. Asa Perley, gentleman, and Thomas Perley, yeoman, both of Boxford, sold 19 Apr 1769, for £66, 150 acres of land to Peter Damon of Weston.—Registry, 64: 154. They sold 13 Feb., 1767, for £133 6s. 8d., 175 acres in Weston to Joseph Parker of the same place. This was a part of the land laid out to Capt. Thomas Perley and Capt. Stephen Peabody. The witnesses were Dudley Perley and Enoch Perley.—Registry, 66: 523. All these persons were Allen's neighbors in Boxford. He may have been an agent there for the sale of these lands.2
  • Allen Perley and Judith Case published their marriage intention on September 11, 1779 in Winchendon, Massachusetts.2
  • Allen married Lydia Porter on January 29, 1794 in Gardner, Massachusetts, (int. 24 Nov 1793.)2
  • He was in Gardner a selectman 1800-1, and member of the school board in 1808. His father, Asa of Boxford, gentleman, gave "his son Allen, cordwainer, of Boxford," 80 acres of land No. 176, in Winchendon, drawn on the original right of Thomas Lord, 4 Jun 1776, witnesses Samuel Perley and Solomon Perley.?Registry, 77: 103.2
  • He died in December, 1829, probably in Gardner, Massachusetts, at age 79. Lydia Perley was administratrix of estate of Allen Perley of Gardner, 20 Jan 1830. The inventory of Allen of Gardner's estate was filed 23 Feb 1803— real estate $30 and personal $149.35. It seems by registry, 341: 1 and 344: 277, that Allen sold his estate, for $1000, to his son Asa in consideration of the support of himself and his wife Lydia during their natural lives, 30 Jul 1828, half of lot of 80 acres, formerly in Winchendon, but in Gardner at that time. This transaction occasioned the small probate inventory in 1830.2
  • Last Edited: 4 Sep 2009

Family 1: Judith Case b. perhaps 1752

Family 2: Lydia Porter b. October 12, 1756, d. March 3, 1846

Citations

  1. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 57.
  2. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 133.
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Allen Perley1

b. May 13, 1763, d. June 24, 1843 or June 24, 1848
  • Reference: 3846fbbc
  • THIS LISTING HAS NOT YET BEEN AUDITED, AND MAY NOT BE ACCURATE; A.
  • Allen Perley was born on May 13, 1763 in Linebrook Parish, Ipswich, Massachusetts. His home was the farm just north of and around the old cemetery, about a mile east of his birthplace. The farm was originally a Fisk place. In later years it was owned successively by Clapp, Day and Woodward. In 1904. it was occupied by Adam G. Lauer. Mr. Perley was a diligent farmer, and for those times a successful one.2
  • He was the son of Allen Perley and Martha Fowler.1
  • Allen married Esther Burpee of Rowley in November, 1788.3
  • Allen died on June 24, 1843 or June 24, 1848.4
  • He was buried in Linebrook Cemetery, Ipswich, Massachusetts, qwcenterwqALLEN PERLEY
    DIED
    June 24, 1843.
    Æ. 82.

    Kind father, thou hast left us,
    And thy loss we deeply feel;
    But 'tis God that hath bereft us.
    He can all our sorrow heal.

    How loved, how valued once avails thee not.
    To whom related or by whom forgot;
    A heap of dust alone remains of thee.
    'Tis all thou art, and all the proud shall heqw/centerwq.4
  • Last Edited: 13 Sep 2009

Family: Esther Burpee of Rowley b. perhaps 1765, d. February 4, 1853 or February 4, 1858

Citations

  1. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 64.
  2. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 163-164.
  3. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 164.
  4. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 164. Confusion about the date is due to poor print quality and very small font in the book.
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Allen Perley1

b. March 1, 1781
  • THIS LISTING HAS NOT YET BEEN AUDITED, AND MAY NOT BE ACCURATE; A.
  • Allen Perley was born on March 1, 1781 in that part of Nova Scotia which became New Brunswick, Canada, in 1785-85.1
  • He was the son of Oliver Perley and Sarah (?)1
  • His grandfather Thomas Perley bequeathed him (calling his name Aaron) a sum of money, if he shall live with his uncle Aaron Perley in Boxford during his minority. Allen was eight vears old when the will was drawn and fourteen when his grandfather died. He is not mentioned in his father's will 25 Sep 1813.1
  • Last Edited: 3 Sep 2009

Citations

  1. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 120.
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine

Allen Perley1

b. perhaps 1776
  • THIS LISTING HAS NOT YET BEEN AUDITED, AND MAY NOT BE ACCURATE; A.
  • Allen Perley was born perhaps 1776.
  • He was the son of Eliphalet Perley and Anna Porter.1
  • Last Edited: 24 Apr 2010

Citations

  1. M. V. B. Perley, History and Genealogy of the Perley Family, , at https://archive.org/stream/historygenealogy01perl . Salem, Mass.: Published by the Compiler, (1906) , p. 131.
If you are related to this person, please consider joining the Kin 'o Mine Facebook group, or email me at Steven G. Levine